About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
CSPAN 9
CNN 6
CNNW 6
MSNBC 3
LANGUAGE
English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
was shot and killed in his kandahar home today. a killer a bodyguard who taliban officials say they hired to infiltrate karzai's inner circle. this comes as a blow to the government just days after a visit from u.s. defense secretary leon panetta. we're joined by william cohen. thank you for being with us. >> good to be with you. >> let me ask you about this assassination. some have said this will be a huge propaganda victory for the taliban. do youee? >> anytime they can get that close to the inner circle of president karzai it's a big victory for them. it points out the difficulty that president karzai has had in trying to cope with the local politics as such where all frequently invoking tip o'neill's axiom that all politics is local. we're seeing that all politics are local in afghanistan. that's one of the problems that president karzai has. secondly his brother has a reputation of being a power broker. most of our military leaders have said there's not a military solution in afghanistan it's a political one. it makes it that much more difficult. i think it's going to be more challen
made in the last year and reclaiminghe former taliban ronghold particularly in the south. another major change in the last year is the surge in afghan security forces. there are now 100,000 more afghan security forces than 18 months ago when president obama announced the surge and another 70,000 afghan soldiers and police will be trained and equipped by the end of next summer when all 33,000 u.s. search trips will have withdrwn. in the testimony to congress last week, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mollen characterized the president's decision as, quote, more aggressive and incurring more risk than mcraven had initially recommended. however, admiral mullen felt, could come only the president and the end can really determine the acceptable level of risk we must take because as he put it, quote, the truth is we would have run other kind of risks by keeping more forces in afghanistan onger. and among the other risks for the risks of perpetuating the greater afgh dependent on the forces and inhibiting the growth and keep the devotee and confidence on the part of the afgha
of the taliban. how did it happen? anananananann] this...is the network. a living, breathing intelligence that's helping drive the future of business. in here, inventory can be taught to learn. ♪ machines have a voice. ♪ medical history follows you. it's the at&t network -- a network of possibilities... committed to delivering the most advanced mobile broadband experience to help move business... forward. ♪ >>> it just may be the most egregious example to date of widespread corruption in afghanistan. american taxpayer money, hundreds of millions of dollars, ending up in the hands of the taliban. a year-long u.s. military task force discovered that the money was siphoned from a $2 billion transportation contract to provide most of the supplies to american troops. a source with knowledge of the investigation has briefed cnn about how it all went down. we are joined now from the afghan capital, kabul. just tell us briefly, how did this happen? >> reporter: this is coming from an internal report, but basically what happened was trucking companies subcontracted out to local entities here, who
making against the taliban as well as al qaeda. as well as $800 million in assistance could be suspended. this could cause some major problems. if pakistan takes tougher action, the aid could resume. mean while, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan. panetta is meeting with american military leaders and afghan officials. nbc's atia abawi is in kabul this morning. bring us up to speed on what leon panetta is saying that al qaeda is basically on the run and close to being completely stamped out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. the new secretary of defense's first trip as the defense secretary here in afghanistan, prior to arriving he talked to reporters on the plane about how he feels alg al qaeda is going right now, the war against terror. he says the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach, primarily pointing the the death of bin laden, the information they got from the compound including names of different key al qaeda leaders. he says this is the time to actually end the war with al qaeda. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happen
. the -- the whole issue is on that border. the border with afghanistan, waziristan, taliban, al qaeda, other troops are operating. >> pakistan will continue the fight, even without the $800 million in military aid, it will continue the fight against the militants. a lot of people are saying, where have you been until now? what fight is taking place at this point? >> it's true. it's a fair criticism. it's a fair criticism that the pakistanis haven't done enough in certain areas. you have to balance that by saying it's a very tough fight for them as well. they've lost 30,000 troops fighting terror in their country. they've had numerous terror attacks. they're doing hard. it's not like it's sitting on their hands. there long has been, the continues to be things as that security services are helping some groups that are anti-u.s. the anti-u.s. sentiment in the company are not diminishing, but growing. >> i have to talk about the royals. >> it's your thing. >> prince william in california playing polo? i love this. >> he did well, he scored goals as well. i wonder if the defense was a little bit loose t
we take you inside a secretive flds community that one investigator compares to the taliban. imagine that. right here in the united states. first let's check in with isha sesay. >> reporter: game show host alex trebek isn't just on jeopardy, he's also talking about the terrifying moments when he was in jeopardy. we'll tell you about his run in with a burglar. that and more when anderson cooper 360 continues. call her. ok. [ cellphone rings ] hey. you haven't left yet. no. i'm boarding now... what's up? um...would you mind doing it again? last time. [ engine turns over ] oooohhhh...sweet. [ male announcer ] the chevy cruze with the my chevrolet app. the remote control car is finally here. well, now she's just playing with us. oh. [ horn honks ] somewhere in america, a city comes to life. it moves effortlessly, breathes easily. it flows with clean water. it makes its skyline greener and its population healthier. all to become the kind of city people want to live and work in. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest questions. and the over sixty thousan
going to the taliban? well, it's a little confusing but it has to do with a $2.16 billion transportation contract that the united states has to promote afghan businesses and within that, in the fine print somewhere could be that your tax dollars will fund the taliban. >> in particular, a whole bunch of money is going to fund trucking operations across afghanistan to get military supplies different places and it sounds like a lot of the money that we are giving these eight various trucking companies somehow winds up and we have tracked the money. it goes from our coffers directly through big shots in the afghanistan government and winds up in the pockets of the insurgents. >> we usually do that in iraq. we did it through private contractors. this time we want to try to build up the local economy by hiring local afghans that have affiliations with the local taliban that pay off the taliban not to attack the american stuff. >> why don't we just pay the taliban directly? >> might as well be. it's our money. it's $2.16 billion has gone into the pockets of the taliban, petraeus put a commissi
at these countries, that they are not radicals connected to terrorists like al qaeda or the taliban, or the muslim brotherhood. in egypt, for instance, right now, and tunisia and other countries in the middle east, we do not know who is going to be in charge. we are talking about supporting various governments, when they have an election. until we see what happens in the elections, we should not be giving money to those who are sympathetic in working with terrorist organizations in do not have our interests at stake. or want to destroy the state of israel. so, right now, for instance, in egypt the barrier between egypt and gaza has been broken down, in effect. hamas, in control of gaza right now, can bring in more weapons to attack israel. a signal that really bothers me, because it indicates to the muslim but -- brotherhood that they have more influence than people realize. in the past they have asked for the destruction of israel. and host: the muslim brotherhood is not considered a terrorist group. guest: if you look at their history, they have been committed to changes in the middle east, incl
killed karzai. the taliban says -- >> we've seen the worst so far. excessive heat warnings and advisories posted in 23 states. the heat in many areas could reach 115 degrees. the heat wave is being blamed for one death in madison county, illinois. in oklahoma it was so hot, that part of a highway buckled. look at that. motorist was hospitalized after his bike hit the buckled pavement. in arkansas several communities have opened cooling centers. good rule of thumb in tis heat whatever you're doing don't overdo it. >> if you're going to go outside in heat like this better be drinking a lot of water before you come out. make sure you have some substance in your stomach or you might be going to the hospital. >> it was hard to stay focused because it was so hot out. >> dehydrated, exhausted, just tired. >> right now nearly 400,000 people in the chicago area are still without power following the worst storm in a decade. utility officials say it could be several days before many of those customers are back on-line. the video we're looking at here, i think you saw an airplane there, i'm not sure,
morning in oslo. greg, thank you. it appears some of your tax money has found its way to the taliban in afghanistan. the pentagon says funds from a $2.1 billion trucking contract to get supplies to american troops were funneled to the militants. a pentagon spokesman says a new contract will be awarded and applicants will be more thoroughly vetted. >>> we have an update tonight on the u.s. government law enforcement initiative that allowed guns to fall into the hands of mexican criminals. we have an exclusive report on some of the buyers in operation fast and furious. >> it's a lot of guns. that was the first thing that came into mind. >> this attorney represents manuel acosta, the man accused of recruiting 19 straw buyers later indicted for smuggling guns to mexico. >> they walk into a store, fill out a form, they buy a couple of rifles and walk out and give it to the guy. he gives them a few hundred bucks. >> to purchase a gun every buyer fills out this form. it asks, have you ever been indicted for a felony, been charged with a crime that allows for a year in jail? are you subject
not the end of the taliban. you're looking at core group of individuals founded al qaeda and running it over the years. that may be on the brink of collapse but let's not say this movement is near its end. jon: so a little bit like turning the lights and cockroaches scatter? you may kill them off in places like afghanistan but they are over in the other places, somalia and arabian peninsula? >> that's right. actually this is a testament to bin laden's plan for the al qaeda network. he created a more diffuse network after the united states began to crack down on al qaeda in late 1990s. you saw rise of al qaeda in north africa and al shaback in east africa. al qaeda in iraq done great damage to u.s. forces. the taliban was once a government but relegated to affiliate movement of al qaeda. what you have a is number of organizations sort of franchises of al qaeda that continue to grow and thrive while we have focused in on the core as we called it. now i think after the death of bin laden in early may, i think we were able to get a lot of intelligence. we've gone after a lot of the other high-le
associated allies, especially the taliban, of course. he also felt like there had been progress in developing and training the afghan national security forces, the army and the national police, especially in the past year-and-a-half. still a long way to go. he did not make any comments specifically yesterday about the killing of ahmad karzai. he let those comments to the white house. it expressed regret and condemn the assassination of president karzai's half-brothers. i think there is concern generally that there could be some instability, beahmad wali karzai in its prominent position in canada are what ikan -- kandahar, he was a key figure in keeping control there. that may have been more of a concern a year ago before the u.s. had managed to reclaim control of that area with its afghan allies and partners on the ground. so there may not be as much ramification now as there might have been a year ago. still there is likely to be jockeying for position and power among the local forces there. host: finally, the defense secretary did not cut a pakistan on this particular trip. did he talk abou
over this month and, panetta said he hoped to drive the taliban to peace talks during the period when u.s. force draw down and is key they keep the pressure up now so there is a chance of some kind of reconciliation in the country. back to you, jamie. >> jamie: thanks so much, david. >> eric: so is secretary panetta's assessment of al qaeda on target or is the install installed pentagon chief possibly speaking too early? for more, let's bring in fox news contributor and former ambassador totty nations, john bolton, who joins us this morning from jerusalem. good morning, ambassador. >> good morning, glad to be here. >> eric: panetta's prediction sounds awfully optimistic. you hope he's right. we got bin laden. does that mean in your view we can actually finish off al qaeda, once and for all? >> well, you know, this is almost 180° switch for the administration. president obama had told us for some time that those old-fashioned concepts of victory and defeat were really outmoded and we need to think about success, rather than victory. now, we have secretary panetta, saying that merely by
the taliban to peace talk in the period when the u.s. forces draw down. it is key to keep pressure up now to give the country a chance of some reconciliation. speaking in capped har, the new defense chief said the focus of the trip is the handover of security to afghan forces. he acknowledged that the remain, "a lot more work to do in terms of being able to transition the responsibility to them." now that leon panetta has moved to iraq, his focus will be on the situation there and concerns as he said here about iranian weapons smuggling. after all, 15 u.s. troops were killed there last month. back to you. >> shannon: all right, david. thank you very much. crews in india are scrambling through wreckage at this hour, desperately searching for survivors of a deadly train crash. more than 100 people were hurt and at least 31 killed when this express train derailed near the city of luknow. the death toll has been rising all morning long. the train was heading to new delhi from calcutta when officials say 12 cars skidded off the tracks. ♪ ♪ >> shannon: much of the debate over reigning in th
happen in kandahar province, which is the real former stronghold of the taliban. he has a lot of enemies, both among the insurgency and also among the various criminal networks that work in that area. he himself has been accused of drug ties, criminal ties, and even of being on the payroll of the cia. all things that ahmad wali karzai denies. he has a very murky reputation. it's hard to know, even though the taliban claims responsibility, what happened and who is behind it. host: how does the u.s. view him? guest: the u.s. has most recently seen him as an unsolvable problem. he has been a friend to the u.s. for a long time. because he has been someone who has been hard to bring on board with some of the programs to develop the province, to work with the military -- no one says this directly, granted, because he is a relative of hamid karzai. in private talks, u.s. officials would say they do not know exactly how to handle him. at the same time, he was also someone who was exerting a certain amount of control over the area and able to pass by areas that may not have otherwise been passed
. the threat is not from the taliban, but apparently from their own government . >> he held me like this. >> it happened in seconds. >> where did they hit you. >> punches to the gut from four attacks. a few baton whacks and the kicks to the body. >> i was thinking about -- that i'm going to die today. >> the victim of the attack was the pakistani journalist. his attackers were not street thugs they had police uniforms on and pulled him over. >> they said if you want to be a hero, we will make you a hero. >> and an example. >> it's not clear who roughed him up, but he is feeting over a string of attacks against journalists that raised a troubling question. are the spy agents? they told the british paper, the guardian he was kidnapped and beaten after he wrote a report about illegal arrests by intelligence agencies, whoever beat him a second time didn't like that they made him look bad. >> the last time, they threatened to wrap my body. under these circumstances, what can i do? >> his beating came less than three weeks after the still unsolved murder of another pakistani journalist. for ye
radio address and she addressed the issue of the taliban and women in afghanistan. she focused on the challenges related in afghanistan. it is not something she intended to focus on when she went to the white house in 2001, but certainly history change the course of all about. she immersed herself and found a way to make a difference in women's lives and girls' lives are on the world. she has taken these opportunities to speak to the communities. host: i noticed yesterday at the funeral in palm desert, calif. that two of the speakers talked about the sisterhood of the first ladies. barbara bush will be there in grand rapids when lynn cheney is speaking to it. is there a sisterhood of the former first ladies? guest: i think there is. it is a very small club. many dead get to serve as first lady. -- there are not many that get to serve as first lady. at the betty ford funeral, they turned out to show their respect. they show that there is a way to be friends and set aside the differences in politics. it was really heartwarming to see rosalynn carter be a part of that service. and
.s. taxpayer money has been indirectly funneled to the taliban under a $2.16 billion, a $2 billion transportation contract. this is crazy. it should not be part of the job of the u.s. military to promote afghan businesses. this report found, quote, documented credible evidence of involvement in a criminal enterprise of support for the enemy, unquote. this is ridiculous. and it comes on the heels of a report last week that the navy has spent at least $300 million, at least $300 million, on two ships that were never completed, never sent on a mission, and are now headed for a salvage yard in brownsville, texas. are there no fiscal conservatives at the pentagon? and sadly, most people in congress today are afraid to cut the defense department for fear they will appear to be unpatriotic. and yet it seems to me, mr. speaker, that it's unpatriotic to continue with megabillions and wasteful spending, or billions in spending that promote businesses in other countries. no part of the federal government should be immune from having to save taxpayer money. the american people would be far bet
is training eventual new members of the taliban. he further stated, trainers are doing a wonderful job but we don't have the time to make an army or police force in afghanistan. the general closed his email to me by saying this, every day someone dies. every day someone dies. it is time to bring our troopings home from -- troops home from afghanistan. how many more children have to cry in a mom or dad's grave site because their mother or daddy went to afghanistan to prop up a corrupt leader named karzai that we send $10 billion a month to? i hope no other children have to cry like edy and stephanie. that brings me to my close, mr. speaker. several weeks oak eugene robertson in his editorial titled "afghanistan strategy, let's go." we wanted to kill or capture osama bin laden, and we did. even so, say the hawks, we have to stay in afghanistan because of the dangerous instability across the border in nuclear armed pakistan. but does anyone believe the war in afghanistan has made pakistan more safe? no, it has not. in fact, it's more fragile now than it's ever been. the threat from afghanistan i
from the terror of the taliban, and afghan forces are taking more responsibility for their security, and he takes with him and memories of americans who have made the old of -- the ultimate sacrifice to make this possible. lee roy gave me the extraordinary privilege of showing me the small plaque bolted to his profit a farm. on it are the names of the fallen rangers from -- goes into his prosthetic arm -- bolted to his prosthetic arm. on it are the names of the fallen rangers. those who did not come back the day. christopher's mother, sister, and grandmother are with us today. i would ask that they stand briefly so we can show our gratitude for their families profound sacrifice. [applause] our heroes are all around us. they are the forces behind the force, like ashley, who during his deployments has kept the family strong, so we are grateful to her and the other armies spouses here. [applause] the military children like britney, austin, reagan, and land in, -- landen, who is there to gently rubbed his hand across arm, so we are there to recognize good children as well. [applause] ou
the taliban a tactical defeat in the south, as significant as what we have done in 2001 when we first went into the country and very, very dramatic and the challenge we have is this president's decision to scale the forces down so significantly, by september of next year, puts that -- those gains at risk, and, also, puts at risk what we are trying to do in the east, next year between kabul and the pakistani border. >> jamie: sounds like the way you are describing it, we are on track. >> we're on track but i'm concerned, the forces coming up so quickly will put the mission at risk and remains to be seen whether we can accomplish the mission, and i don't like saying it but that is the truth. >> jamie: what about leadership? i have read reports and you can certainly tell me, whether it's is true or not, that hamid karzai is really not in control. we have seen a family member of his and also some people in the administration, there, be assassinated. >> look, karzai is what he is. i mean, there's a central government in afghanistan but it is a power broker, patron agent system, he shares power
reflects the suffering of all afghan people. the u.s. has condemned the killing. a taliban spokesperson said they hired the gunman and he was punished for all of his wrongdoings. leon panetta with no comments about the military role in the middle east saying the u.s. will have an enduring presence for many years. panetta was making remarks during his first visit to iraq as pentagon chief where he met with nuri al maliki yesterday. just one of several issues he's tackling during his trip. here's chief pentagon correspondent traveling with the defense secretary. >> reporter: the new secretary of defense leon panetta was troubled by the landscape below. u.s. forces said to withdraw by the end of the year are caught up in a war. 15 americans killed in the past month by iraqi extremists armed with rockets and roadside bombs supply by iran. panetta told a gathering of soldiers the killing must end. >> my first responsibility as secretary of defense is to make damned sure we do everything necessary to protect you. >> reporter: panetta pressured iraq's top officials to send iraqi military force
was on the run for 16 years and the taliban reportedly training chinese muslim kids in terror camps now. the kids were shown how to plant roadside bombs. london's daily mail said they posted a recruitment video of the young terrorists in training. brian? >> stepping up security screening after new evidence shows that terrorists are using surgically implanted bombs to attack america and americans. some of these doctors of death have been educated here in the united states of america. joining us right now from phoenix is the president of the american-islamic forum for democracy. say it ain't so, doctor, this is true? >> well, i don't think we should be surprised. i mean, these positions, we've seen it with the bombers and we've seen it an mit scientist and an emergency doc that was healing al-qaida to go back. we've seen it from dictators like one in syria who was trained in london and went back to be one of the worst dictators in the middle east. >> i want to run through some of them who have been chronicled. this guy that you just mentioned went to columbia. >> yeah. remember, they are trained
members of the taliban. trainers are doing a wonderful job but we don't have the time to make an army. and, mr. speaker, then, it was kind of sad the way he closed. every day somebody from our country dies. a marine, a soldier, an airman, navy, whatever. mr. speaker, i bring posters on the floor. i have probably 12 now that i want to bring on the floor every time that i speak to remind the house that there's pain in war. the wife to my left on the poster is in tears. the little girl who's about 2 years of age, she doesn't understand why this army officer is kneeling before her with a folded flag. but, yet, i will say to the little girl, when you grow older and you are old enough to know your daddy was a real hero, sergeant jeffrey shear, who gave his life for this country. mr. speaker, that leaves me to sharing with the house an editorial that was written about four weeks ago by eugene robinson and the title is "afghanistan strategy: let's go," and i want to read from his editorial. slinder threads of hope are nice, but they do not constitute a plan, nor do they justify continuing to pour
, a bomber blew himself up in the city of lashkar gah. at least 12 were hurt. the taliban claiming responsibility. and four people have died after two small planes collided mid air. it happened near tracker creek, alaska. you're looking at one of the planes, completely destroyed after it hit the ground and burst into claims and the other plane was damaged in the collision and did not hit the ground. the pilot is the the sole survivor, he surveyed the other plane's wreckage from the air and saw no signs of life and managed to land safely in anchorage. no word what caused that collision. being called a miracle, a caribbean airline jet flies off the runway and splits in after in the country of guyana, the flight at jfk slid off the runway and stop short of a deep reconvenient before breaking into two. 30 people were hurt and none of the injuries are life threatening. and they're looking into the possible cause of the crash. nobody responded to this crash, no ambulances, no help. it was a sight to see in cedar rapids, iowa, hundreds gathered to match the implosion of a parking garage.
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)